Michigan Football: Where will Ben Bredeson be selected at the NFL Draft?

Michigan football is sending a host of starting offensive linemen to the NFL Draft in 2020.  We’ll take a look at guard Ben Bredeson and where he may land.

Michigan football head coach Jim Harbaugh recruited Ben Bredeson from Wisconsin, where he enjoyed a tremendous high school career en route to winning himself the Joe Thomas award given to the state’s best offensive lineman as a senior in high school.

Bredeson also won the Gatorade player of the year award.  Bredeson was heavily recruited by the Wisconsin Badgers, as you could imagine but decided to commit to play for Jim Harbaugh.  It’s no secret why Harbaugh seems to draw plenty of talented offensive linemen to his program.

Harbaugh prides himself on the pro-style, power run football.  A way for the offense to march the football down the field methodically, controlling the time of possession with their ground and pound style of offense.

Also, Harbaugh brings NFL experience to any prospect he is recruiting, as a player and a coach.  It means something to an NFL-hopeful to have a coach that’s played at the highest level and has coached at that same level.  Sure, Harbaugh hasn’t had the success Michigan football initially expected, but when you look at where the program was, to where it is and where it might be in a year or two, he’s been successful.  Not as successful as you’d want, but also not as bad as some make it out to be.

Bredeson is a senior classman entering the NFL Draft.  He’s expected to be a third or fourth-round draft pick.  A bargain in the fourth-round if you ask me.  Bredeson was a four-year starter at Michigan playing the left guard position; he started in 46 of the team’s 51 games during his tenor at Michigan.  He was named a team captain during both his junior and senior seasons.

Bredeson isn’t projected to be a hall of fame lineman or anything, but he has enough potential to be a starter in the NFL.  Bredeson is limited to some when it comes to agility, bend, and finesse, but he’s perfect for a power-run style of offense.  He is susceptible to being bullied by a speed-rushing interior lineman on sure passing downs at the NFL level.  He does have athletic limitations; he won’t ‘wow’ you with his ability to pull out and be a lead blocker or thrive at getting to the second level of the defense. Still, he should excel exploding off the line of scrimmage, mauling a tackle right in front of his facemask.

Last season the Michigan Wolverines were transitioning their offense away from the power-run scheme into a more modern spread offense under the direction of Josh Gattis.  It was erratic quarterback play that hampered the offense more than anything.

The Michigan guard stands 6-foot-5 and weighs in just shy of 320 pounds.  He’s a prototypical NFL mauling-type guard that will benefit from playing in a run-first offense.

The Detroit Lions should strongly consider drafting Ben Bredeson with the 85th pick in the third round of the NFL Draft.  He’d start immediately in Detroit with their right guard vacancy left by another former Wolverine, Graham GlasgowJoe Dahl is Detroit’s starter at left guard right now, he or Bredeson would have to slide over to the right side.

Other organizations that immediately stand out who should be in the market for an interior lineman are the Baltimore Ravens, Buffalo Bills, Cincinnati Bengals, and Carolina Panthers just to name few.